Covid traveling tips.

Covid traveling tips.

As most traveling happens in public spaces, it made sense for many to want people only to do essential travel during Covid 19.  However, after almost two years of Covid, many who put off traveling have decided that life must go on.  I wholeheartedly agree, and while there is no absolute way to avoid Covid, there are some precautions we can take to minimize our risks.  Here are five Covid traveling tips I think help minimize your risks while traveling.

Get vaccinated.

There are many reasons people have for choosing to or not choosing to take the Covid vaccine.  Everyone is entitled to their choice and opinion, and I respect that choice, whatever it may be.  I realize that there may not be a lengthy body of research on the vaccines and their long-term effects, but pausing my life as I did in 2020, is no longer an option.  I have always lived a life of taking risks and slightly different choices.  The Covid vaccine is simply another one of those choices for me.

Choose a window seat.

Before Covid, my preference was always for an aisle seat.  I like the ability to move around at will without having to disturb my seatmate. However, in an aisle seat, you are exposed to everyone who passes by you.  The aisle seat gives you more exposure to people who may be sick.  A window seat allows you to be more distant from the majority of airplane passengers.

Use the overhead bin.

As somewhat of a germophobe, the thought of putting my purse on the floor is disgusting.  Putting your things on the floor exposes you to more germs.  The airline may have wiped down the seating area before you got on, but I know for sure the floor has not been sanitized.

Sanitize your seat area.

For many sanitizing wipes has become the norm, and they are not only useful for your hands.  Seatbelt buckles, armrests, headrests, tray tables, and screens are all places that the passenger before you have touched.  Be sure to sanitize them, as you can never be 100% sure it was done for you.

Wear your mask.

To me, this is a no-brainer, but unfortunately, it’s not too many passengers. Many travelers seem to get into a sense of total relaxation during travel.  I know masks are uncomfortable, but in addition to the benefits of filtering out the air, it prevents you from touching your nose and mouth with your hand.  The same hand that’s been touching the very public seat you’re sitting in.  Additionally, it is a federal mandate. No matter what airline you travel on, it is guided by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). It’s not possible to eliminate all the chances of getting sick on an airplane.   But taking steps to lessen your exposure can be done. Traveling is a part of life and may be necessary.  As with all travel, travelers should stay informed and plan accordingly.  I hope these tips help. Let me know. Subscribe

5 Flight attendant annoyances

5 Flight attendant annoyances

There are many things that flight attendants find annoying. Some are more annoying than others, and some may not be an annoyance based on the individual flight attendant. The following are some that I still remember as being annoying to me. For disclosure, these are from my lived experience as a flight attendant.

1.Coffee: Having been raised and based in New York as a flight attendant, if a passenger said, “regular coffee,” I understood it to mean coffee with milk and sugar. If they said, “light and sweet,” I like most flight attendants had no idea how light to make the coffee or how many sugar packets the passenger needed. Some passengers meant just a drop of milk, and others wanted half milk, half coffee. Deciding how many packs of sugar meant sweet to a person you’d never met was a pointless guess at best. Like passengers, flight attendants are people from all over the country and the world; knowing each passenger’s specific coffee requirements was most times an exercise in futility.

2.Aisle Passengers. Most passengers prefer aisle seats because of the ability to have a little extra room. This preference was often a perception that overlooked the fact that the aisle they assumed to be extra space was the flight attendant’s working space. Airline service carts could be a hundred pounds or more and somewhat challenging to maneuver. Weighted down with beverages or food to serve the number of people on board, often proved a challenge for a flight attendant to operate. Aisle passengers often extended their body parts into the aisle, and it was not uncommon for the cart to inadvertently hit a passenger. In many cases, the passenger got angry at the flight attendant without considering that the service cart was at least 3 feet long and even higher. Hence, the flight attendant seeing over the cart, and the extended body part was unreasonable at best.

3.Touching. Passengers often think it is ok to touch or poke a flight attendant to get their attention, which is often very annoying to flight attendants. A flight attendant call light is within every passenger’s reaching distance, and using this is much preferable than to be poked. Moreover, a hand wave or similar gesture is universal regardless of language. Having your body nudged several times a flight could be rather annoying.

4.Lavatory doors. They are not automatic, and standing in front of them will not make them open. Often passengers would stand in the lavatory area waiting for flight attendant instructions on how to open the door or be told whether it was vacant or not. Bathroom doors, like every other bathroom door elsewhere, has a lock. Unlike most bathrooms, airplane bathrooms have instructions, and most often, if not in the native language, there is visual signage. Along with signage, airline lavatories also have an occupied/unoccupied sign, which in most cases are red and green and are universally understood to mean the same everywhere. To be seen as a bathroom attendant is very frustrating to flight attendants.

5.Asking “where are we?” Flight attendants walk up and down the aisle, usually positioned several feet above the window level. Furthermore, like most passengers, they cannot pinpoint locations 30,000 feet above the ground. Yes, several landmarks are apparent to some, but flight attendants do not have the luxury of sitting and looking out the window on flights, nor do they have an inner GPS. Your guess is as good as theirs.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this glimpse behind the scenes. These are perceptions of my lived and actual experience as a flight attendant. I hope they’ve been eye-opening and will make for more happy travels.

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